Machiya- The Delicate Townhouses of Kyoto with Ms. Pauline Chakmakjian

The Noguchi Machiya - a Kyoto machiya still used as a private residence. The mushiko mado can be seen on the second floor

The Noguchi Machiya – a Kyoto machiya still used as a private residence. The mushiko mado can be seen on the second floor

On Thursday, August 8, Tomodachi members and guests gathered at Tokoname Restaurant in Manoa for the annual “Let’s Talk Luncheon.” This year’s featured guest speaker was Ms. Pauline Chakmakjian, a Trustee of the Japan Society of the UK and a Governor of the English-Speaking Union. She is an expert in the subject of Freemasonry and has also had the experience of living in a machiya. Read More

Traditional Japan in Aiea Heights

Walking up to the Tea House

The tranquil Japanese style garden of the Bellinger residence set the scene for the July 11th Tomodachi gathering. Tomodachi members Roger and Masako Bellinger opened their home to showcase their vast collection of art, antiques, and artifacts from Asia, Southeast Asia, the South Pacific, and Hawaii. The highlight of the garden was a custom built tea house sitting high at the back of the property and offering views of Pearl Harbor and Ewa. Read More

Tomodachi Hinamatsuri at Consulate General of Japan

On Tuesday, February 26, Consul General Toyoei Shigeeda and Mrs. Michiko Shigeeda graciously opened their residence to the Japan-America Society of Hawaii’s annual Tomodachi Hinamatsuri celebration in honor of Girl’s Day. Also known as the Doll Festival, Hinamatsuri is traditionally celebrated on March 3rd by Japanese families to ensure their daughter’s future happiness. JASH members and guests were entertained by slack key guitarist Bobby Moderow Jr. and were able to partake in a variety of refreshments provided by the Consulate’s chef and the Tomodachi Committee members. Read More

Tomodachi Christmas Tea

Uncle Charlie serenades the group with a Christmas sing-a-long

On Thursday, December 15, Tomodachi members and guests gathered together at the Waioli Tea Room in Manoa to celebrate the annual Christmas Tea. Guests were able to enjoy a selection of tea and refreshments in the Ginger VIP room while the snow-like Manoa mist fell outside. Once again, Charles K. “Uncle Charlie” Morton serenaded guests with Christmas songs on his guitar. Read More

Remembering Pearl Harbor

Panelist Betsy Fujii Young explains the internment camp experience

On Tuesday, November 29, Tomodachi presented “Remembering Pearl Harbor” at Natsunoya Tea House in honor of the upcoming 70th anniversary of the Pearl Harbor attack. Panelists who were living in Hawaii on December 7, 1941, shared their first hand experiences and experiences of relatives. Read More

JASH holds Annual Dinner honoring U.S. Military

(Front L-R: JASH Chair Sharon Weiner, Mrs. Hideko Oriki, General Ryoichi Oriki, Mayor Peter Carlisle, Mrs. Judy Carlisle; Back L-R: Consul General Yoshihiko Kamo, MC Lara Yamada, JASH President Ed Hawkins, Mrs. Etsuko Kamo, Mrs. Vickie Darnell, Lt. Gen. Daniel Darnell, Caoli Cano)

On October 20th, The Japan-America Society of Hawaii (JASH) honored U.S. Pacific Command and all the military components that took part in “Operation Tomodachi,” the U.S. military’s response to the tragic earthquake and tsunami this past March 11 in northeast Japan, at its annual dinner with the JASH Bridge Award. The Bridge Award recognizes individuals or groups in the community who have worked hard to promote the important relationship between U.S. and Japan. This year, because of the tragic events in Japan, JASH decided to make the theme of the dinner “Friends in Need–Japan Disaster Relief,” and recognized the U.S. military for Operation Tomodachi. Over 400 attended the gala event, including members of the military services. A video tribute was also played in their honor. Read More

East Meets West Let’s Talk Luncheon

Lillian Yajima shows off the eight sided origami box

JASH members and guests enjoyed the sixth annual Tomodachi “Let’s Talk” Luncheon at Le Guignol French Restaurant on August 30, 2011. This year’s special guest was long time JASH member Lillian Yajima who led a hands-on origami session after lunch.Read More

Tomodachi Committee Battleship Missouri Memorial Special Tour

The USS Missouri boasts nine 16" guns each with an accurate shooting range of 23 miles

The USS Missouri boasts nine 16″ guns each with an accurate shooting range of 23 miles

On Tuesday, June 21, members of the Tomodachi Committee enjoyed an exclusive 45 minute long tour onboard the USS Missouri. Attendees had the rare opportunity to see areas not available on regular public tours, such as inside the front gun turret. Even members who had previously been on the ship were impressed by the special tour. The highlight of the afternoon was tea and refreshments in the Captain’s Cabin. The Captain’s Cabin is where the ship captain’s quarters are, and where he would entertain distinguished guests. VIP guests such as President Harry Truman and President George W. Bush have frequented the Captain’s Cabin. This portion of the ship is normally locked and off limits during regular tours. Read More

Tomodachi Committee Celebrates Hinamatsuri

(L-R) JASH President Ed Hawkins, Consul General Yoshihiko Kamo, JASH Chair Sharon Weiner, and Mrs. Etsuko Kamo pose in front of the hinaningyo display

(L-R) JASH President Ed Hawkins, Consul General Yoshihiko Kamo, JASH Chair Sharon Weiner, and Mrs. Etsuko Kamo pose in front of the hinaningyo display

On Tuesday, March 1, Consul General Yoshihiko Kamo and Mrs. Etsuko Kamo graciously opened their residence to the Japan-America Society of Hawaii’s Tomodachi Committee for the annual Hinamatsuri program in celebration of Girl’s Day. Read More

Wally Yonamine, Baseball Trailblazer

Hawaii and Maui born Wally Yonamine, a trailblazer in bringing American “hardball” style baseball to Japan, passed away at the age of 85. A sports standout, Wally was the first Asian American to play football in the NFL and the first American to play professional baseball in Japan after World War II. Though he had many accomplishments both in the United States in Japan, Wally was most noted for bringing his hard-hitting, aggressive, American style of baseball play to Japan, thereby transforming how baseball was played there. Wally faced discrimination both at home and abroad because of his background, but overcame all to become a highly respected player and coach. Later, his charitable work and willingness to teach the younger generation about setting high standards and pursuing personal goals won high accolades from both communities. Read More